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You’ll need a radiologist to diagnose your stomach cancer

There is a radiologist in Oregon named Dr. Joseph C. Kim. Can a radiologist diagnose stomach cancer? It depends on how large it is.

There is a cancer doctor in California named Dr. Joseph Kim. He’s at the City of Hope and he’s a surgeon.

If you have stomach cancer, you may develop an emergency like a bleeding vessel. You may end up in an emergency room and you’ll get treated by Dr. Joseph C. Kim in California. He’s an emergency medicine doctor.

If you want to avoid stomach cancer, it may be wise to avoid kimchi. If you’re Korean, this may be very difficult.

Joseph C. Kim, M.D.

Joseph Chaiwhan Kim, M.D.
Internal Medicine
Medical Doctor

Dr. Joseph C. Kim, M.D.

This website is written by Dr. Joseph C. Kim

Joseph Chaiwhan Kim, M.D.

Thank you for visiting.

Fresh and pickled vegetable consumption and gastric cancer

What do Japaense and Korean men have in common? We get stomach cancer. We also drink and smoke, which doesn’t help.

Don’t miss this interesting study titled:

Fresh and pickled vegetable consumption and gastric cancer in Japanese and Korean populations: A meta-analysis of observational studies

It is widely known that vegetable consumption contributes to reducing the risk of gastric cancer (GC). However, the incidence rates of GC remain high in both Japanese and Korean populations, even though they have a high consumption of total vegetables. This may be due to the fact that Japanese and Koreans mainly consume processed vegetables, such as cooked, salted, or pickled vegetables, rather than fresh vegetables. To determine whether the intakes of fresh and pickled vegetables have different effects on the risk of GC in Japanese and Korean populations, we carried out a meta-analysis of published epidemiological reports. Eight studies on the consumption of fresh vegetables and 14 studies on the consumption of pickled vegetables related to GC risk were included in this meta-analysis. Four studies exploring differences in GC risk in men and women were considered separately.

We observed that a high intake of fresh vegetables was significantly associated with a decreased risk of GC (overall summary OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.46–0.85) but that a high intake of pickled vegetables was significantly associated with an increased risk of GC (overall summary OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.06–1.53).

The results of this meta-analysis provide evidence that a high intake of pickled vegetables may increase GC risk and suggest that a high consumption of fresh vegetables, rather than a large total amount of vegetables including pickled vegetables, is important to reduce GC risk. (Cancer Sci 2009)

Dietary factors and gastric cancer in Korea

Here is an older study from 2002: Dietary factors and gastric cancer in Korea: a case-control study.

Int J Cancer. 2002 Feb 1;97(4):531-5.

Kim HJ, Chang WK, Kim MK, Lee SS, Choi BY.
Department of Preventive Medicine, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract
To assess gastric cancer (GC) risk in relation to dietary intake in Korea, a case-control study was performed. Trained dietitians interviewed 136 patients diagnosed with GC, and the same number of controls were selected by matching sex, age and hospital. A significant decrease in GC risk was observed with increased intake of Baiechu kimchi (prepared with salted Chinese cabbage and red pepper, etc.), Baiechu kimchi-stew, garlic, mushroom and soybean milk. On the contrary, a significant increase in the risk of GC was observed with increased intake of cooked rice with bean, charcoal grilled beef, pollack soup, Kkakduki (a kind of kimchi prepared with salted radish and red pepper, etc.), Dongchimi (a kind of kimchi prepared with radish and a large quantity of salt water) and cooked spinach. In food groups, increased intake of soybean products was associated with decreased risk of GC. Intake of citrus fruits rather than total fruits was shown to have a protective effect on the risk of GC, but was not significant. In this study, intake of total vegetables was shown to have a protective effect, whereas high nitrate-containing vegetables increased the risk of GC. In conclusion, our study suggests that the risk of GC decreased with high consumption of fresh vegetables and fruits, whereas high consumption of foods rich in nitrate and carcinogenic substances produced during the cooking process increased the risk of GC.

Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
PMID: 11802218 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

Eating kimchi causes stomach cancer (gastric cancer)

There was a medical research study performed by scientists in Korea. They found that in a certain population of patients, “a high consumption of kimchi, soybean paste, and stews was associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer.”

More specifically:

Stratified according to the NAT2 acetylator status, high consumptions of kimchi, stews, and soybean paste showed higher risks of gastric cancer in slow/intermediate acetylators than in rapid acetylators. The odds ratios for the slow/intermediate acetylators were 4.82 (95% CI: 3.23-7.19) for kimchi, 2.34 (95% CI: 1.64-3.34) for stews, and 1.82 (95% CI: 1.29-2.58) for soybean paste, respectively. The odds ratios for the rapid acetylators were 3.03 (95% CI: 2.00-4.62) for kimchi, 1.60 (95% CI: 1.07-2.38) for stews, and 1.42 (95% CI: 0.95-2.10) for soybean paste.

Nitrate levels are high in kimchi.

The full article can be found here:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2766547/

Int J Cancer. 2009 July 1; 125(1): 139–145.
Effects of Dietary Factors and the NAT2 Acetylator Status on Gastric Cancer in Koreans
Yan Wei Zhang, Sang-Yong Eom, Yong-Dae Kim, Young-Jin Song, Hyo-Yung Yun, Joo-Seung Park, Sei-Jin Youn, Byung Sik Kim, Heon Kim, and David W. Hein

doi: 10.1002/ijc.24328
PMCID: PMC2766547
NIHMSID: NIHMS137636

by Dr. Joseph C. Kim

I am Dr. Joseph Chaiwhan Kim. I am a Korean medical doctor and I will be writing about stomach cancer and kimchi.